Educational Activities

During my postdoc, I’ve engaged in a handful of rewarding educational outreach activities. I worked as the teaching assistant for the USArray 2013 short course held at Northwestern. I prepared short sessions on understanding the seismic instrument response and using Funclab to analyze Receiver Functions. I’ve also been working with graduate students at USC to become familiar with body wave tomography methods and apply the imaging method to new study regions. Finally, I guest lectured an introductory seismology course teaching basic seismic reflection and refraction methods.

I began my career in seismology through an IRIS Internship in 2006 with Richard Allen at UC Berkeley. I then acted as the IRIS Internship Alumni mentor for 2009, 2010, and 2011. This rewarding experience taught me the value of organizing and preparing educational resources, two of which are now available through the IRIS E&O website:
[Matlab Tutorial]

[GMT Tutorial]

Throughout my tenure as Alumni Mentor I met, helped, and challenged several of the brightest students interested in earth science. Several of these undergraduate students are now graduate students in earth science.

In 2010, I spent a week working with the EarthScope USArray Data Processing and Analysis Short Course at Northwestern as the teaching assistant. This was a very interesting experience for me as I straddled a weird middle ground between the students (many were at a similar level in their education as I was) and the instructors who were able to more easily move forward in presentations as I tackled specific questions. More on that workshop can be found [here].

At Berkeley, I’ve been a Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) for two classes and also participated in freshman seminar fieldtrips. I first worked as a GSI for EPS122 which teaches upper division students about the fundamentals of plate tectonics. I then worked as a GSI for EPS20 which teaches students from a broad background about the natural hazards which affect daily life around the Hayward Fault.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s